Academic Catalog

Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 133  Introduction to Anthropology  3 cr.  

This course presents core concepts and principles of anthropology, including the concept of culture as viewed by the anthropologist. Specific areas of study are physical anthropology (evolution of humans, racial classification), archeology (characteristics and development of early cultures) and language as it relates to the biological and social evolution of humans.

ANTH 134  Cultural Anthropology  3 cr.  

This course provides an overview of cultures and how they are studied by the anthropologist. Topics examined are subsistence patterns, language and communication, culture and personality, gender and family patterns, economics and political organizations, religion and magic, the arts, and cultural change. Emphasis is placed upon evaluation of other cultures in terms of their respective values and norms.

ANTH 237  Indians of North America  3 cr.  

This course demonstrates the continuum of indigenous cultures in North America from Pre-Columbian times to the present using anthropological, archaeological, historical, and ecological data to study cultural processes and changes and the ways they affect interethnic and interracial interaction in the United States. The emphasis is on the cultures, adaptations, and problems faced by various North American Indian groups, both pre-contact and today.

ANTH 239  Study Abroad Seminar-World of the Maya: Anthropology, Archaeology And Ecology  3 cr.  

This course focuses on the indigenous Maya people of Mexico and Central America, utilizes the International Education Program to provide direct personal contact with the culture. The course explores major Maya archaeological sites, contemporary Maya villages, Spanish colonial towns and cities, and the local ecological settings.

ANTH 240  Travel Seminar: World Cultures  3 cr.   (2 + 0 + 3)  

This travel seminar provides an overview of a select culture and focuses on cultural universals including subsistence patterns, language and communication, culture and personality, gender and family patterns, economic and political organization, religion and magic, the arts, and cultural change. Emphasis is placed upon evaluation of the select culture in term of its respective contextual values and norms.